Marea

Installation, Portrait, Landscape, Abstract informal, Architecture, Video installation, 300x90x150cm
The installation of MAREA (two-channel video) consists of two videos projected onto elongated scrim screens, viewed in perspective, and facing one another at a 1:1 scale. Through the simultaneous, mirrored projections of a camera circling a long, communal table, the traditional center of attention (i.e., the table as center) is relocated to the empty intersection, or "gap", between the two moving fields, creating a de-centering that shifts perspectival space and social constructs at once.

MAREA is a video (9 minute looping sequence) that depicts a bizarre social encounter - an empty table where somebody intermittently sits - tracing the perimeter of the table in a sweeping circular and fluid movement, holding both foreground and background in focus by using a dolly on a radiused track. The idea is to hold the edge of the table as the only constant, while foreground and background, subject and object, are constantly shifting within the frame of the fluid camera movement. The setting on a rooftop presents an urban dreamscape that is both remote and familiar, and the image of single man, shifting places through clear cuts in the editing, is both singular or plural, empty or full, lonely or accompanied, real or imagined.

The music, essential to the installation which includes a 10.2 surround-sound system, is an original composition by Rafael Rondeau, the artist's brother, with whom she often collaborates on her work and installations. This piece is a collaborative work between siblings that are ten years apart - a full generational gap - which allows them to reconnect through memory, experience, and specific familial points of reference. The piece has three main movements, and the looping sequence repeats 9 times to follow the structure of the music. The sounds themselves are constructed from sounds found in Guatemala - markets, churches, nature, as well as the voice of the artists' daughter, eliciting strong references to family, memory and place.

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